GRANDSTAND EXHIBITS

THE AIR-CONDITIONED GRANDSTAND gives Festivalgoers a chance to take an intimate look at the vibrant culture and art of Louisiana. Spanning both weekends on the west wing of the first floor, this year’s special exhibits include tributes to George Wein, Sylvester “Hawk” Francis, Dr. John and Art Neville. In special dedication to longtime demonstrator Sylvester Francis, this grandstand exhibit area is newly named Sylvester “Hawk” Francis Hall.

REMEMBERING THE LEGACY OF BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM’S SYLVESTER “HAWK” FRANCIS

For 31 years, culture bearer and historian Sylvester Francis held court in the Grandstand, sharing his life’s work with festival-goers. Founder and director of Backstreet Cultural Museum, Francis would build an exhibit of carefully curated Jazz Funeral photography and memorabilia, Social Aid and Pleasure Club crafts and second line mementos. Always included were his rare recorded film footage of New Orleans’ funerals, second-lines, Baby Dolls, Skull and Bone gangs, and Mardi Gras Indians. This year, his daughter Dominique Dilling Francis carries on his legacy, with a tribute to her late father. Included in the exhibit will be photos and video recordings, as well as second-line mementos. In honor of his lasting legacy, the Jazz Fest exhibit hall in the Grandstand will carry his name as the Sylvester “Hawk” Francis Hall, with a special dedication.

GEORGE FEST:
A CELEBRATION OF GEORGE T. WEIN

A pictorial tribute to George T. Wein, founder of Jazz Fest, whose lasting legacy is the modern music festival as we know it. During his 75-year career, in which he worked with musical icons ranging from Louis Armstrong to Frank Zappa, George Wein changed the music industry forever. This exhibit gives a rare glimpse into the backstage (as well as onstage) life of a music business revolutionary and a cultural visionary.

FROM THE 3RD WARD TO THE 13TH: REMEMBERING DR. JOHN AND ART NEVILLE

Milagros Collective co-founders Felici Asteinza and Joey Fillastre, along with their ever-changing cast of collaborators, have created a site-specific tribute to the late Mac Rebennack (Dr. John) and Art Neville. Both Dr. John and Art Neville, whose songs and personalities reflected a vast spirituality, a great sense of humanity and a deep funk, made important contributions to the music and the singular culture of the Crescent City. With photographs and text from the New Orleans Jazz Museum, this exhibit is a remembrance to two New Orleans giants whose loss is still felt by New Orleans.